Making the Move With Your Houseplants

If you are someone who looks around your home and sees plants that you have put your heart and soul into for years, then the thought of them not accompanying you to your new home is pretty disappointing. Giving one or two plants away is one thing, but anything more than that is not something anyone wants to do. Well, you will be happy to know that plants can make the move with no problem, even one of significant distance, if you plan properly.

Plan On Moving Yourself

Although you can ask your moving and storage company if they will handle houseplants, it is very rare that you will find any who will. Every company has a different policy, but since they are difficult to put monetary value on them, most can’t move them for insurance reasons. If they were to be damaged, then there would be the potential for a lengthy claim fighting over the value. Not to mention, do you really want someone else handling them? Plus, moving trucks can be very hot in the summer and like a freezer in the winter; houseplants should be moved in a temperature-regulated environment. Read More

Houseplants: What to Choose, What to Avoid and Why

When moving into a new home, it is common that you will treat yourself (or receive) a new plant.  But which  indoor plants are best for your environment? Do you suffer from plant allergies? How much and what kind of light is available? What schedule do you have? How ‘green’ is your thumb? How much room do you have for your plants?

Allergies

If you suffer from allergies, you may want to avoid blossoming plants. They all naturally produce pollen, which any allergy sufferer can tell you exacerbates congestion, sneezing and watery eyes—all uncomfortable conditions. Stick to leafy plants that don’t blossom or don’t blossom much at all. None is better, though.

Light

Plants that need direct sunlight won’t flourish with even abundant indirect sunlight. Make sure you have the space available where you need it for the type of plant you place in any location in your home. The converse is true for plants that love indirect light: Don’t place them in direct sunlight, for they will not survive the heat and the UV rays. Read More